Summer arrives – brandy returns! – and autumn donut flavors start this weekend.

In the market we have:

  • Vegetables: zucchini, summer squash, cabbage, peppers (many kinds), cucumbers, kale (red Russian and curly from Becca’s garden), eggplant, sweet corn, green beans, Brussels sprouts, onions (many kinds) and shallots.
  • Blueberries:  We have them in both small and large picked quantities (from pints up to 1o pound boxes.) We hope to have picked blueberries around for about one more week to 10 days. Our own field of U-Pick blueberries is done for the year….thanks to everyone who came out to pick!
  • Cantaloupe: Our own melons are ready and coming in every day. Given the expected heat, they will probably only last about a week. So come get some soon.
  • Watermelon: Our own are slowly coming in.
  • Apples: We have 3 kinds of summer apples on the market now: Paula Red and Earli-blaze for eating or cooking, and Mollie’s Delicious, which is a sweet eating apple. We have small quantities on the market. If you want bushels, it is best to call ahead to make sure we have them.  If you are trying to make applesauce. we have some Paula Red “seconds” available at 1/2 price.
  • Picked Tomatoes:  Field tomatoes are coming in, along with 5 kinds of mini-tomatoes. We have the mini’s available to sample.  See which one you like best, or you can get a box with all the kinds mixed.
  • U-Pick Tomatoes:  When will U-Pick tomatoes be ready has been the question of the month and we haven’t had a good answer due to this year’s unusual weather.  It looks like we will open next week. But….we need your help (and a little more patience) as we open the field up. Given the pent-up demand for tomatoes this year, particularly with the blight that has hurt many gardens and farms in the area, we need to control the flow of customers for a while until there are plenty to pick (which there will be in September hopefully.)  So, if you are wanting to come out in the next few weeks, please call the market and ask to be put on our U-Pick list. We will schedule customers in as there are enough ready, to avoid having so many folks out at the same time that not everyone gets want they want.
  • Potatoes: we have four kinds of potatoes on the market and we dig them fresh.  We have white, red, Yukon gold, and the russet baking potatoes.   We will have potatoes by the bushel if you would like them for fall/winter use.  Let us know how many you would like and when we do our final harvest we can call you.  (269-244-5690).
  • Fresh cut flowers and fresh herbs   

    Flowers are at full peak now

    Flowers are at full peak now

What’s coming next:

  • In next week’s update, we promise to get you the fall apple forecast on what kinds we will have, when they will be ready and pricing.
  • Concord and Niagara grapes: This is the 2nd most frequently asked question behind tomatoes is when will the grapes be ready. Please check back about September 9th and we will hopefully have an opening date by then. Before we open, we will want them to be at their full ripeness and sugar content, so it may be closer to the middle or end of September before we open (weather dependent of course). We will have plenty to pick. Pricing will be the same as last year. 25 cents a pound or 20 cents a pound if you pick over 100 pounds.
  • Around Labor Day weekend we expect to pick the few Bartlett pears and Stanley prune plums that we have this year (most were lost in the severe winter and the May frost).
  • spplumsres

    Plums are about a week away from being ready.

You can see the toll that the winter/frost took on these trees by how few there are.

You can see the toll that the winter/frost took on these trees by how few there are.

Brandy: You read correctly! The wait is over and we’ve begun selling Hubbard’s Brandy again. The brandy we are selling now was produced at the height of last year’s bounty, capturing the essence and spirit of the harvest. For brandy, we have apple, cherry, Concord grape, Niagara grape, double distilled Niagara grape, and pear. We also have our sweet ‘Polecat’ wines: blends of apple brandy infused with apple, black cherry, sweet cherry, and peach juices. Please note: we are not doing Saturday tastings for the time being, and we aren’t licensed to sell on Sunday’s before noon. Thank you for understanding. 

Hubbard's brandy!

Hubbard’s brandy!

This weekend in the bakery we will have:

  • Pies: apple, blueberry, berry peachy, cherry, cherry berry, chocolate, peanut
    butter, peach, strawberry rhubarb, and fresh blueberry glaze.
  • Cookies: apple and flower cut outs, monster (oatmeal, choc chips, m&m’s and peanut butter), chocolate chip, lemon, and caramel apple.
  • Bread: Whole Wheat, cinnamon, vegetable, blueberry zucchini.
  • Double chocolate zucchini muffins and blueberry zucchini muffins.
  • Cinnamon rolls, cinna-monkeys, and sticky buns.
  • Donuts: Apple, buttermilk, pumpkin.
  • Slushies: Apple cider and white grape peach

If you would like to reserve any baked goods please call us at (269) 244-5690.

A note from the bakers: With the aroma of fresh apples coming into the market
this week, we could not help but think of fall. This weekend we will be switching
to our fall flavors of donuts, which include apple, and pumpkin along with our
standard buttermilk. We also have a new slushie flavor for you to try: white
grape peach. It is a slightly sweet peach flavor that is heightened by the white
grapes, definitely a must try! See you this weekend! -the Bakers

From Becca’s Garden: Red Russian kale, curly kale, chard, sunsugar cherry tomatoes, jalapeno peppers, celery (please ask in person if you’re interested and I’ll cut it fresh for you), herbs. I’ve got lettuce and spinach growing for fall, leeks looking good, carrots coming for a few weeks from now, and hey! A picture for you to enjoy.

naturalinsecticide

Natural insecticide in Becca’s garden.

Local meat: One-pound packages of bacon are back! New this week: bulk ground sausage thanks to requests from customers. Let us know what you think. We also have spare ribs, bone-in pork chops, bacon sausage breakfast patties, regular breakfast patties, mild links, and hot links. Look for all these items in the freezer in the bakery.

Happenings on the farm this week:  Two good things happened here this week, we got some summer-like weather and rain!  Both which will help give our summer crops that have been struggling a little boost.

We also have started on a very difficult and time consuming task of re-training new grape vines to replace the ones that were injured by the severe winter in some of our  white Niagara blocks.  We have all been learning how to do this and trying to figure out if there is any easy way (we haven’t found it!) since this is the first time we have ever had to do this in the lifetime of these vineyards. (Note: this will not affect the U-Pick grapes this year….we will have enough grapes for everyone to pick.)

grpvinenotmowres

We have not mowed the vineyards this year as we needed to protect all of the grape vines until we could do this task.

The goal is to select several grape vines to train to replace this trunk next year.  This is the hardest part!

The goal is to select several grape vines to train to replace this trunk next year. This is the hardest part!

 

The finished result--several nice grapevines wrapped around the trunk and the wire.

The finished result–several nice grapevines wrapped around the trunk and the wire.

Everyone at Corey Lake Orchards thanks you for buying local.  Hope to see you soon.

 

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Mid-August update

This weekend on the market we will have:

  • Blueberries:  We have them in both small and large picked quantities (from pints up to 1o pound boxes.)  Due to the cool summer, blueberries will be around for most of the month of August for all of us to continue to enjoy. U-Pick Blueberries:  Our own small field is open,  there are still a few there to pick for those just wanting to take the family out for the experience. If you are trying to pick larger amounts, call us and we can recommend several other local farms.  269-244-5690.
  • Cantaloupe—we are still bringing in melons from Indiana….although….we did pick three of our own this today…so soon we will have ours.
  • Tomatoes:  Finally we are bringing in some field tomatoes, the normal red,  yellow and mini tomatoes.  We are encouraged to see them start to ripen, so give us about one more week (and some heat) and hopefully we will be able to update you on when we will have bushels available and U-Pick.
This is the U-Pick field---just need some heat to ripen them.

This is the U-Pick field—just need some heat to ripen them.

  • Vegetables: zucchini, summer squash, cabbage, peppers, cucumbers, kale (red Russian and curly), eggplant,  green beans, Brussels sprouts and shallots.
  • Potatoes:  We have four kinds of potatoes on the market and we dig them fresh.  We have white, red, Yukon gold, and this week we started harvesting the russet baking potatoes.  While you may think a potato is a potato, when you buy them just dug, the flavor and texture are amazing.  They are $1 a pound, 5 pounds for $4, or 10 pounds for $7.50.
  • Onions:  We finished harvesting the onions today and they have really nice size again this year, check them out hanging on the market or in the onion barn. The varieties we have available are: yellow candy, red candy apple, white super star, cippolini, red marble cippolini and red tropea torpedo.
    IMG_0020

    Many types of onions being brought in on the truck.

    IMG_0022

  • Sweet corn is$2.50/half dozen, $5/dozen, or $20/bushel (which is 5 dozen). We have finished with our corn for the year and will be bringing in Stear’s corn in through Labor Day.
  • Fresh cut flowers and fresh herbs

This weekend in the bakery we will have:

  • Pies: apple, blueberry, cherry, chocolate, coconut cream, peach, strawberry rhubarb, and fresh blueberry glaze.
  • Cookies: apple and flower cut outs, monster (oatmeal, choc chips, m&m’s and peanut butter), chocolate chip, lemon, and caramel apple.
  • Bread: whole wheat, cinnamon, vegetable.
  • Double chocolate zucchini muffins and blueberry zucchini muffins. Cinnamon rolls, cinna-monkeys, and sticky buns.
  • Donuts: blueberry, buttermilk, and cherry.
  • Slushies: apple cider and white grape cherry.

If you would like to reserve any baked goods please call us at (269) 244-5690. This week’s fall-like weather put us in the mood to jump-start apple season. So, today we made one of the fall favorites: caramel-apple cookies. In preparation for fall, we are offering specials on our frozen Northern Spy apple pies: these pies will be good in your freezer for the rest of this year, so if you would like to stock up for Thanksgiving or any other holiday, or just because you love apple pie, now is the time. The large frozen pies will be $1 off (making them $10) or buy 3 for $25. Some customers have expressed concern about whether a frozen pie will taste as good as one not frozen.  We have already proven this by baking the apple pies we froze earlier this year, so if you have gotten a baked apple pie from our bakery this year…the one out of your own oven will taste exactly the same!

The Three Rivers Triathlon is Saturday, August 16th. We are once again pleased to help sponsor this event and look forward to seeing the racers. There will be fresh fruit waiting for you when you finish. Good luck racers!! As always, we welcome you to try our own farm Triathlon if you are up to the challenge:

  • Event 1: Carry six 10-pound boxes of blueberries from the truck into our cooler.  Note: the height of carrying this many covers most of your face so you need to look around the boxes while you walk!
  • Event 2: Carry bushels of potatoes (60 pounds each) on uneven surfaces across the field, across irrigation lines (oops watch for the mud) and to the waiting truck.
  • Event 3: Pull onions alongside us! Bend over, pull one pound onions out of the ground (they will resist–they have been growing there comfortably all year), gather 7 or 8 in a bundle, tie, then when you have 4 bundles finished, carry all to the truck.  Repeat this sequence for a total of 8 hours!

….No takers?

Happenings on the farm this week. There’s not much new coming out of the garden right now – these cool nights (and a predicted temperature of 47 this evening!) are taking their toll on Becca’s produce too. In cheerier news, we harvested our shallots and they are the largest we have ever grown. You will find the shallots hanging all over the market, braided into small and large bunches. We also discovered who could and could not braid shallots–Becca won our informal braiding contest, thus nearly each lovely braid of shallots has been personally done by her (thank you, Becca).

If you have never used a shallot, you should try them!  Many recipes call for these as they combine the best of scallions, garlic and onion. Most of us prefer using them in recipes that call for raw onions (dips and salsas) because their texture is smoother and their flavor creamier and more balanced than an onion’s.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Braiding shallots

Braiding shallots

So, while this is not any earth-shaking bit of news—the sunflowers by the old hay rake in front of the market have bloomed, completing the look I was trying to achieve along with the morning glories. This gives me a chance to tell you about this hay rake.   It has been sitting in the fence row in the back of the farm for as long as I can remember (and that’s 50 some years). Every time I went by it I felt like it deserved more than to be covered in dirt and vines, so finally convinced the crew to help cut it out of there and put it by the parking lot. To me, it is a really interesting and elegant tool.  Hay rakes like this originated in the 1800′s, which made the process of collecting hay much more efficient. The horse drawn rake could collect eight times a much in a day as someone raking by hand. This one does not have any markings or brand names, so I haven’t been able to learn much more about this type. However….if you’d like to learn more about hay rakes in general, including how even 10-year-olds knew how to use and operate them….read on (meanwhile I hope you enjoy looking at it as much as I do each day): http://atwww.farmcollectorshowdirectory.com/equipment/the-origin-of-hay- akes.aspx#axzz3AIrcgyKL

hayrake

Everyone at Corey Lake Orchards thanks you for buying local and we hope to see you soon. 

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Early August update

This weekend on the market we will have:

  • Blueberries: This week’s variety is Blue Crop, a very sweet berry. We have them in both small and large picked quantities (from pints to 1o pound boxes.)  Due to the cool summer, blueberries will be around for most of the month of August for all of us to continue to enjoy. U-Pick Blueberries:  Our own small field will remain open for about one more week, and there are still a few there to pick for those just wanting to take the family out for the experience. If you are trying to pick larger amounts, call us and we can recommend several other local farms.
  • Jersey Mac apples: Very much like a Macintosh apple, good for eating fresh or for sauce, in small quantities only.
  • Cantaloupe—we got tired of waiting for ours to be ready (maybe 10 more days??) so we got some from Indiana. We just cut one and shared it here on the market and it was delicious!
  • Tomatoes:  Finally we are bringing in some field tomatoes, the normal red, some yellow and mini tomatoes.  Since they are still coming on slowly, we are still supplementing with tomatoes from Indiana.
  • Vegetables: zucchini, summer squash, cabbage, peppers, cucumbers, kale, eggplant, peas, green beans and brussell sprouts.   
  • Sweet corn is in its prime and is $2.50/half dozen, $5/dozen, or $20/bushel (which is 5 dozen). We are now picking our last planting of sweet corn for the year and will have ours through this weekend hopefully.  Because we know everyone will want sweet corn through August, we will be bringing it in locally after ours is gone.
  • Fresh cut flowers: As you come into the market, look above the terrace garden at all of the sunflowers that are ready. Also, the gladiolas are starting to flower. This weekend we will have bouquets already made up in addition to the ones you can make yourself.
  • Fresh herbs: Bring your recipes for the herbs you will need for the week and cut them fresh from our U-Pick herb garden located on the corner of the parking lot, or buy them in pre-made bags harvested from Becca’s yard garden. If you don’t find what you are looking for, just ask. There is much more basil and dill in the terrace garden (two of our more popular herbs that get cut quickly).

Gladiolas on the porch, 8/6/14.

This weekend in the bakery we will have:

  • Pies: apple, blueberry, cherry, choco-butter, coconut cream, peach, strawberry rhubarb, and fresh blueberry glaze.
  • Cookies: apple and frog cut outs, monster (oatmeal, choc chips, m&m’s and peanut butter), zucchini chocolate chip, and lemon.
  • Bread: 12 grain, cinnamon, vegetable.
  • Double chocolate zucchini muffins and blueberry zucchini muffins.
  • Cinnamon rolls, cinna-monkeys, and sticky buns.
  • Donuts: blueberry, buttermilk, and cherry.
  • Slushies: Apple cider and white grape cherry.
  • If you would like to reserve any baked goods please call us at (269) 244-5690.

A final note from the bakers: with plenty of zucchini on hand and a craving for chocolate, we have perfected a recipe for double chocolate zucchini muffins! They are a chocolatey (and slightly healthy) way for you to start your day!!  Beth can personally attest that they are amazing and her new favorite bakery item.

We will also have peach pies again this weekend until they are all sold out (which happens rather quickly). If you would like to reserve a peach pie, please call us and we would be more than happy to set one back for you. See you this weekend!!-The Bakers

Local meat: We get pork products from Rolling Meadows Farm just down the road in Jones, Michigan. Good news: bacon is back! Bad news (or good, depending): their meat processor put all the bacon into 5 lb. packages and didn’t give them any of the usual 1 lb. packages. So we’ll only have 5 lb. packs for a few weeks. We put a discounted price on them, however. We also have bacon sausage patties, breakfast patties, spare rib, pork chops, mild links, and hot links available.

From Becca: I’ll have carrots, lacinato (dinosaur) kale, red Russian kale, green onions, jalapenos, and some tomatoes on the market this weekend from the yard garden (yarden), which is managed without synthetic fertilizer, pesticides, fungicides, or any other ‘cides. As always, you’re welcome to call ahead and reserve items, which are labeled in the market with bright green tape.

In both the yarden and the terrace garden I’ve planted some specialty tomato varieties, two of which I’ve pictured here. We might not have true peaches this year, but the yellow tomato on the left is called a “garden peach” tomato: it is very mild, quite sweet, and even has a slight fuzz on its skin. The one on the right is black trifele (pronounced “trifle”), which looks very odd on the outside and even stranger inside: its seeds and flesh are almost black when you cut it open, hence the name. That said, I think it has the tastiest tomato flavor, smoky and sweet and not too acidic. Don’t judge a book by its cover!

As with all of our other tomatoes, these are coming in slowly, they sell out fast, and we can’t guarantee we’ll have them on any given day. Hope for hot nights and call ahead if you desperately want some of these.

Happenings on the Farm this week.

One of our most favorite things happened this week, it rained!!!  We so needed the half inch that fell on Monday evening into Tuesday morning. We took advantage of the rainy day to take out the tomato plants in the greenhouse–so a final farewell to greenhouse tomatoes, we are pleased with how they produced right up through August!

The tomato plants got so big this year, taking them out felt like cutting our way through a jungle!

We also continued harvesting our onions…beginning the annual process of pulling them out of the ground, tying them in bunches, then hanging them to dry so they can “cure” in order for to cut and bag them later for winter use. We have some hanging in the market and lots of them hanging in what we call the “onion” barn, which is the pavilion on top of our hill.  Not only will you see them, you will smell them too!!

Pulling and tying into bunches

Truckload after truckload coming in filled with onions

You’ll also see onion bunches curing on the market.

 

From all of us at Corey Lake Orchards, we thank you for buying local and hope to see you soon!

 

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A bakery celebration–our one year anniversary

Please join us this Friday, August 8th as we take a minute to celebrate the grand opening of our bakery.  We will be handing out free donuts all day and have apple pie specials as well.  A short, formal celebration will take place at 9:30 a.m. for anyone who wishes to attend.

Why celebrate now? This week marks the anniversary of the opening of our bakery, a long-time vision of ours that came to fruition one year ago. But with the demanding schedule of a family farm, we’re just getting around to hosting our grand opening party!

We’re celebrating our bakery staff, who make every pie from scratch. The bakery is led by Michaela, along with the hard work of her mother Patti and neighbor Jan. Together, they craft each pie using a secret crust recipe so good they won’t even share it with me! All of their baked goods are hand made with love. We’re also lucky to have Gene every weekend pitching in to make donuts as well as keep the bakery spotless.

They never get tired of you telling them how good your last pie was or piling up at the counter in lines to get a pastry of your choice to eat at the tables on the market porch while you take in the farm experience.

 

We’re celebrating our farm. We make our fruit pies with ingredients right here, and for that we can thank the rest of the crew at Corey Lake Orchards. With their help, we grow and harvest the delicious produce for the bakery, from the fruit used in the pies and muffins to the vegetables used in some of our breads.

We’re celebrating our hard work. Every morning, the bakery crew already has sticky buns, cinnamon rolls, and bread coming out of the oven, just as the farm crew arrives to start picking the produce for the day.  The market staff is soon behind them, getting fruits and vegetables ready for the day and doing all of those little “behind the scenes tasks” that make the market what it is.  We’re so appreciative, every day, of the people working so hard with us.

We’re celebrating our customers. Every day, we meet new customers. And every day, we talk to our same customers and friends who have been coming to Corey Lake Orchards, some of you for decades.  We love hearing your stories and your favorite memories. It’s been a tough year with the loss of my dad and the weather-related losses we have suffered.  In all honesty, I cannot thank you enough for the support and compassion that you’ve given us – you are all a part of this farm too.

Last year’s frenzy – bulldozers making our parking lot, hammer saws busting up concrete, construction dust blowing all over – feels like it happened ages ago now. The large room that was a cold storage for our apples, a room that most customers didn’t even know existed, was transformed into the beautiful and inviting bakery we have today. We welcome you to join us on Friday as we celebrate the hard work we’ve done this past year and the hard work we hope to do for years to come.

On behalf of everyone here at Corey Lake Orchards, we thank you for buying local.    Beth

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Happy August!

On the market this weekend:

  • Blueberries:  This week’s variety is Liberty.  It is a large, sweet berry.  We have them in both small and large picked quantities (from pints to 1o pound boxes.)  Due to the cool summer, blueberries will be around for most of the month of August for all of us to continue to enjoy.  U-Pick Blueberries:  We have had our own small field closed this week for ripening, it will re-open on Friday morning, August 1.  Reminder, this is for small quantity picking, if you are trying to pick larger amounts, call us and we can recommend several other local farms. Also, we will close the field when it gets picked out so always call ahead to make sure we are open.
  • Lots of green beans:  $2/lb. or $5/3 lb, or $28 a bushel. We have them available for u-pick at $18/bushel. If you want to can or freeze beans for the winter—do not wait too much longer to get them. We only have one more planting to come in for the year. Becca, who is constantly pursuing ways to use lesser known herbs (also known as: lovage), stumbled upon this GREAT tarragon green beans recipe. It really does bring out the flavor of the green beans in a nice way, though if you like your beans very soft and not at all crunchy she recommends you ignore their directions to cook the beans only for 5-6 minutes and instead boil them for 12-15 minutes.
  • Sweet corn is in its prime and is $2.50/half dozen, $5/dozen, or $20/bushel (which is 5 dozen).  (8-2-14:  We are currently out of bushels waiting for the next planting to come in….you may call and leave your name and we can call you when it is available again-269-244-5690).   We are currently picking a nice sized bi-color corn called Reflection. As always, we pick this every day to keep it as fresh as possible. We know there’s nothing like summer sweet corn.  We all have fond memories of Dad during this time of year; he taught us to make sure we always had corn on the market and that it was picked often so it was fresh. Today we did something Dad did frequently – we went out picking at 5 p.m, just to make sure the last customers got their dozen ears when they swung by to pick up some for dinner that night.
  • We also have zucchini, summer squash, cabbage, peppers (a big variety now between regular bell peppers, mini bell peppers, hot peppers, banana peppers, and others), cucumbers, and plenty of onions and potatoes. We should also have some eggplant and peas available.
  • Fresh cut flowers: As you come into the market, look above the terrace garden at all of the sunflowers that are ready. Also, the gladiolas are starting to flower. This weekend we will have bouquets already made up in addition to the ones you can make yourself.
  • Fresh herbs: Bring your recipes for the herbs you will need for the week and cut them fresh from our U-Pick herb garden located on the corner of the parking lot. Ask Becca if you’re looking for an herb and can’t find it.

From the Bakers: This weekend in the bakery we will have:

  • Pies: apple, blueberry, cherry, coconut cream, peach, peanut butter, strawberry rhubarb, and fresh blueberry glaze
  • Cookies: lady bug and frog cut outs, monster (oatmeal, choc chips, m&m’s and peanut butter), zucchini chocolate chip, and lemon
  • Bread: whole wheat, cinnamon, vegetable, blueberry zucchini
  • Chocolate coca cola cupcakes, blueberry zucchini muffins, cinnamon rolls, sticky buns, and cinna-monkeys  (mini cinnamon rolls)
  • Donuts: blueberry, buttermilk, and cherry
  • Slushies: apple cider and white grape cherry

If you would like to reserve any baked goods please call us at (269) 244-5690.

A final note from the bakers: This is the time of year when we would normally be looking forward to the first fresh peach of the season, but unfortunately due to the harsh winter, we will not be able to enjoy fresh peaches. Luckily for everyone, last year was an abundant peach season and we were able to put up several bushels of peaches. We will be making a limited quantity of peach pies to sell on weekends throughout the month of August. We will have a limited quantity available, so if you would like one, please call and have us reserve one for you! While it won’t be the same as eating a fresh peach, it will be at least something to give you a taste of our peaches. See you this weekend!– The Bakers

From Becca: Kale and chard continue, with some peas, some cherry and saladette tomatoes, some turnips, and some spring onions. It’s best to call ahead and ask for things from the garden (which is right alongside the house and maintained without any synthetic fertilizers, pesticides, or herbicides).

My goal this year was to help out at the market, have a nice garden, and learn some things. One thing I have learned is that I need to plant a lot of lettuce next year! I harvest it a few times a week (though I’m harvesting far less than I did in the spring) and it always sells out within an hour. Note taken: I’ll plant more. I’m very grateful for all the support from our customers this year and looking forward to working really hard next year to make you all happy.

Corey Lake Orchards Honey: As many of you know, Dayton and Allene’s daughter Charlotte manages over 30 beehives scattered around the farm. She’s delivered her first honey harvest of the year sourced right from our orchards, meadows, and vegetable fields. A specialty of Charlotte’s are her beautiful honeycomb jars, each made with a simple strip of honeycomb and filled with honey. These come in limited quantities, so please call ahead if you want some. She’s also bringing just regular ol’ honey in jars. And of course, we’ll ontinue to carry honey from Babcock’s Apiary, only a few miles away on Coon Hollow Road, as we have for many years.

From Beth: On my Farmer’s Almanac daily calendar, one of the quotes is: “The weather bureau is a non-prophet agency.” Ah, this year that seems true on many levels. We know you are about as tired of hearing it as we are of saying it—-this unseasonably cool weather is affecting our summer crops and it is the reason why we don’t have things you normally get at this time. So as the calendar turns over to August, a month where we are all used to enjoying summer produce, let me try to give you some updates.

  • Peppers and cucumbers. We are now starting to bring a few bushels in each day, but don’t have enough yet to sell by the bushel. Please check back around the middle of August for an update on larger quantities. You are also welcome to call and get your name added to our list for bushels and we can call you when they are ready.
  • Tomatoes: By now everyone wants to be getting larger quantities of tomatoes for making salsa, juice and canning. This week, we picked our first field tomatoes, one half bushel so far…..it is going to take some heat to get these back on track so that we can have enough for the market by the pound and in bushels and be able to open the U-Pick. Check back mid August on these if you want large quantities or to u-pick.
  • Cantaloupe and watermelon: Still several weeks away.
  • Peaches: A reminder that we will not have any this year due to the harsh winter. Many of you have asked if we will be bringing some in from other areas of the state. If we are able to find any with the right quality and at an affordable price, we might. But so far, this seems very doubtful from the pricing we are hearing from various parts of the state.
  • Plums and Pears. We will have very few of these this year due to the harsh winter, but you can check back about the 3rd week of August for an update. We have also started a list of folks wanting these in case we do have some that we can sell in larger quantities.
  • Fall apples: We will have apples this fall, picked and U-Pick. In a few weeks, we will provide an update by variety of which ones we will have as not every variety made it through the spring frost. We will be making cider this year.
  • Grapes: We will have plenty of Concord grapes and Niagara grapes this year, picked and for you to pick. Check back around the end of August to see if we know when they might be ready.

Happenings on the farm this week: This week we probably all spent too much time talking and lamenting about the weather. Even the rain that was forecasted didn’t come, so we spent our share of time moving irrigation around as it is very dry. We watered the greenhouse for the last time this year, we will pick the tomatoes there one more time this week and then be done. This is the longest we have ever kept the greenhouse going–and frankly wondered if we would have to turn the heat on this week to get the last few tomatoes ripe!! Shutting up the greenhouse for the year is always a sign of tomatoes being ripe in the field, but not this year. Most of you know, my father’s legacy was to have the first tomatoes ready in the state….whatever it took–which was usually planting them in April–covering them up with bushel baskets from frost–replanting several times when they didn’t survive the frost and so on. We have certainly fallen short this year of his annual tomato goals so something we would really like this year from whoever controls the weather–please no early fall frost before we can harvest tomatoes!!

Sunflowers for sale at the market. We will have these and many others for cut flower bouquets this weekend.

 

From everyone at Corey Lake Orchards, thanks for buying local.

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