12147 Corey Lake Road, Three Rivers, Michigan (269) 244-5690

Sweet corn season has arrived….

Vegetables in season: Peas: sugar snap, snow peas, and shell outs. Cucumbers, zucchini, yellow summer squash, peppers, beets, fresh-dug new potatoes, onions, green beans, cabbage, eggplant and……sweet corn!! Finally, we are picking our 2nd planting of sweet corn and the ears are nicely filled out, light bi-colored and very sweet. The early variety that we had last week was just the warm-up act for this! We pick our corn daily and sometimes twice a day, to make sure it is always flavorful.

We have it by the bushel now for those who are ready to start freezing or need it for a large cookout. We consider a bushel to be about 5 dozen and bushel pricing is $20. It does help us if you can call ahead to order your bushels so we make sure we have them. 269-244-5690.

While everyone has a tried and true way of fixing sweet corn, if you haven’t tried some of the new techniques which make the husking easy, you really should.

I love being out in the sweet corn field in the early quiet of the mornings….
We have so many green beans right now….please come get some!!

Tomatoes: Given the cool weather we have been running out of tomatoes on some days….sorry, we know that you always expect tomatoes when you come here, so feel free to call ahead to make sure we have those.  269-244-5690.

Picked blueberries on the market are available now: 10-pound boxes: $26, 5-pound boxes: $13, Quarts: $5 or pints for $3.00. The good news given this summer’s cool weather? Blueberries should last until the end of August.

U-Pick Blueberries:  We have a small blueberry field where we offer “small quantity –less than 10 pounds” picking, for those wanting to bring the family out to pick a few blueberries for fun. We open the field if there are berries to pick, but when we get picked out, we close it again for ripening. As such, please call to see if we are open before you come.  269-244-5690. They are $2.00 a pound to pick.

Cut Flowers are available now on weekends.  You can make your own bouquet from sunflowers, gladiolas, zinnias, snapdragons, cosmos, and asters, and we have lots of greens and other interesting “filler” you can use to give your bouquet a final touch. We grow most of our cut flowers on the terrace garden east of the market, and we hope you feel welcome to walk around, look at everything growing, and enjoy this space!

Flowers on the terrace, 7/24.

From the garden: Peas and carrots! Kale and chard! That’s what’s coming out of the garden this weekend. Call ahead if you want anything – I note that the peas and carrots usually sell out within an hour, as does lettuce (and I might have some this weekend). I’ve got plenty of both sweet basil and Thai basil – I recommend the former for tomato-based recipes, pesto, and most raw dishes. Thai basil holds its flavor very well when cooked and I love it in stir fries, iced tea or herbal tea, or Thai basil pesto (I make it without the Thai fish sauce). As a side note, Beth made me a delicious pea and tortellini salad with Thai basil instead of sweet basil and it was a really great twist. You can pick this recipe up on our market along with the peas and the herbs you will need! As always, look for the green tape on the sign that means it was harvested from the yard garden (or “yarden,” in front of the slide).

Everybody has been asking me about the butterflies in the yarden (and why there are so many of them). They’re imported cabbage moths, and they were the bane of my existence all last month. While I’ve seen a lot of them this month, I’ve been quite pleased by how many times I’ve seen a bird or a wasp eat one in midair, or grab a caterpillar for a quick snack. I’ve spotted a lot of frogs lately, which I also find delightful, and in more disappointing news, I captured my first tomato hornworm moth…hopefully this is an indication that an abundance of ripe tomatoes will be here soon. The only insect treatment I use on my garden is a garlic and hot pepper spray when things get really bad as most organic insecticides that kill imported moths also kill bees and other beneficials, so, I take the bad with the good.

Tomatoes, Thai basil, marigolds (to attract beneficial insects), kale, and shiso all growing together in the yarden.

This weekend in the bakery we will have: 

  • Pies: apple, peanut butter, blueberry, cherry, coconut cream, rhubarb, strawberry rhubarb, and fresh blueberry glaze.
  • Cookies: lady bug and frog cut outs, monster (oatmeal, choc chips, m&m’s and peanut butter), zucchini chocolate chip, and lemon.
  • Bread: whole wheat, cinnamon, vegetable and blueberry zucchini.
  • Chocolate coca cola cupcakes.
  • Cinnamon rolls, sticky buns, and cinna-monkeys.
  • Donuts: blueberry, buttermilk, and cherry.
  • Slushies: apple cider and white grape cherry.

If you would like to reserve any baked goods please call us at (269) 244-5690.

This week we started making cinna-monkeys because some of you think our cinnamon rolls are just too big. So check these out, these are cup-cake sized and pull apart—for those who want a smaller treat!

Local meat: We’re currently working under a bacon shortage and won’t be able to get any until next Wednesday or Thursday! However, sausage bacon patties (breakfast sausage with bits of bacon in the mix) are here, as well as spare rib, pork chops, mild links, hot links, breakfast patties, and boneless loin. As always, you can find these things in the bakery freezer on the bottom shelves. Just a head’s up: we price meat by weight, and the packages do vary in size. Feel free to search around for what you need. And a big thank you to Rolling Meadow Farms for not only supplying us but letting Becca take a tour this week.

Happenings on the farm: In making my rounds on the farm this week, I found some twin fawns who had been well taught by their mother already to enjoy our apple trees. Yes, while cute—the amount of damage the deer do to our orchards, vineyards and fields is very discouraging. Some weeks it is difficult to walk the various vineyards, orchards and fields to keep track of everything. These tours are focused on looking for problems like: is anything eating the plants, leaves, fruit or vegetables (this ranges from deer, rabbits to bugs and worms!!), is there mold starting to grow anywhere, does anything look unhealthy, is the soil dry?

However, the tours can also be very gratifying. This week’s discoveries were: the eggplant are finally ready, there are blueberries to pick again, the cabbage heads are beautiful, the apples are coming along nicely, the newly planted orchards are in good shape, and wow…..how could these green bean plants be so prolific??

Cute, but not.

Thanks from all of us here at Corey Lake Orchards for buying local. We hope to see you soon.