12147 Corey Lake Road, Three Rivers, Michigan (269) 244-5690

Our Last Day for the season: Sunday November 3rd 10-31-19

As the temperatures drop (and snow really?) the time to close our market and bakery is here.   Our last official day for the bakery and the market to be open for the year will be Sunday, November 3rd.  After that, we may be open limited days/hours to sell the remaining apples and produce.   For sure we will be open from 9 until 12 on Saturday, November 23rd, for pre-ordered pie pick up, the chance to stock up on our alcohol products, and whatever else may still be available.

Been a cold week watching the rain drip off the big bell!

We do not have many apples left; there are limited quantities of the following available:

  • Jonathan: Pretty and popular, used for fresh eating and cooking, a favorite for apple butter and taffy apples.
  • Golden Delicious: A gingery-smooth, sweet taste under a thin skin. It’s the most popular yellow apple, good eaten fresh, baked or cut in salads.  Makes a nice apple sauce and many people use for canning pie filling.
  • Red Delicious:  America’s most popular apple, known for the “five little bumps” on the bottom. Best for fresh eating and snacks. Full-flavored sweet taste, yellowish flesh, and crisp texture.
  • Cameo: Firm, crisp and sweet, tart. Great for snacking or baking. Keeps well in your refrigerator.
  • Ida Red: Suits your every use! Eat fresh or for cooking. Taste is both tangy and tart. Flesh is white, crisp and juicy. Favored for sauces, pies and desserts. Texture holds up well when baked.
  • Fuji: Has a fantastic sweet flavor and tart flavor, with a low acid content.  An incredibly good keeper, it says crisp for weeks without even being in the refrigerator. 
  • Rome: A big, round apple right out of storybooks! Rome’s have a mild, sweet flavor. Most popular for baking because it holds flavor and shape well.

Apple pricing for the year:  $26 a bushel**, $14 a half-bushel, $8.00 a peck (1/4 of a bushel), $6 a half-peck, $3.50 a 1/4 peck and $1.00 a pound.

Apple Cider update:  We pressed our last cider for the year this week and hope to have it last through Sunday.  If you are looking for over 5 gallons, feel free to call and order it and we’ll hold it for you.   Cider is easily frozen by taking out a cup or so from the gallon jug to give the ice room to expand.

Squash:  We have many varieties of winter squash, and want to help you get stocked by offering a larger quantity sale.  You may purchase a bushel of squash (can mix and match any that we have) for $30.  If that is too many, fill up one of our handle bags with squash of your choice (about 1/2 bushel and around 10 squash depending on the size) for $15!

Buy a bag or a bushel!

This weekend in the bakery we will still be taking orders for Holiday take and bake pies.   We will have one November order pickup day which is Saturday, November 23 from 9-12.  So all you procrastinators, this is your last chance to order what you need for the holidays (and just to have in the freezer for yourself!)

Donuts:  Friday, Saturday and Sunday will be your last days to indulge in our donuts this year!  Make sure you visit the bakery, it may be the only warm place around the farm to be!

This weekend’s offerings will be:

  • Cookies:  Cut-out cookies, Frosted Lemon, M&M “Monster”, Chaos, Mudslide, and Salted Caramel
  • Pies:   AppleBlueberry, Cherry, Pecan, and Pumpkin.
  • Apple Crisp
  • Breads: Wheat and Rye Herb, Potato Scallion, and Herb Baguette.  Whole Wheat, Honey Oatmeal, Cinnamon, Italian.
  • Cinnamon Rolls, Sticky Buns, Yeast Donuts, muffins, scones
  • Dessert bars: peanut butter mousse, chocolate caramel, lemon burst, chocolate truffle, chocolate and white mousse
  • Fall flavors cake donuts: Buttermilk, Apple Cider, and Pumpkin (Available Friday, Saturday, and Sunday)
  • Slushies- 3 flavors; Unpasteurized Apple Cider, White Grape Peach, and Grape blend. 

Look for our “take and bake” pies for you to stock up on in your freezer (for you to indulge in). “Take and bake” pie choices are all large-9″ pies and available flavors in the freezer now.

Alcohol offerings:

  • Brandies:  Pear, Grape, Apple, Cherry, Peach, and Grappa
  • Rye Whiskey
  • Hard Cider flavors: Another summer favorite is back, Strawberry!  We also have Standard Dry, Standard Sweet, Bark Bite, Cortabella, Preach, Blueberry, United Squash Federation, Ginger and Brunch.
  •  Our final brandy tour and tasting will be this  Saturday from 1 until 3 pm, in the Brandy Barn/Distillery.  We offer brandy, wine and some hard cider samples. It’s always an interesting and fun experience.  After we close for the season, we’re happy to offer appointments for picking up any of our alcohol products.

Everyone at Corey Lake Orchards thanks you for buying local, we hope to see you our last weekend!

 

***Storing Apples:

Apples are best kept in your refrigerator, preferably the crisper drawer or in an unsealed plastic bag. Refrigerate apples separately from vegetables because apples naturally release small amounts of ethylene gas that can be damaging to lettuce and other produce. If you have a root cellar, you can keep larger amounts there if it is cool, dry and dark.

For every 10 degrees above 30°F, the apples’ lifespan decreases dramatically. You do not want the apples’ temperature to fall below 30°F, however, because that will make them freeze and turn to mush when they’re thawed. Their cell walls will all collapse. Therefore, apples are best stored somewhere around 30-35°F, in a humid environment.

If storing apples in the fridge, place them inside a crisper drawer and lay a slightly dampened paper towel on top of the apples. Apples are one of the few fruits that really do benefit from being stored in the fridge as quickly as possible. Keep them in the crisper drawer with aforementioned damp paper towel, or else keep them in perforated plastic bags in a cold shed or cellar.

There is trust to that old adage: “One bad apple rots the whole bunch.” Apples give off a lot of ethylene gas, and so just one bruised and rotting apple will give off enough to swiftly ripen (and rot) the others. If you have any bruises or soft spots on an apple, set it aside for eating. Don’t store with the other apples.

Ultimately, if you’re planning on storing a lot of apples for the winter, look for firm, long-lasting apples. These are usually thick-skinned, tart apples. We recommend storing Rome or Fuji, properly stored they will last until spring.